Commands using grep (1,907)

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kde4 lock screen command
If you wish to launch the kde4 screen saver without the password prompt to exit, use this command: $ qdbus org.freedesktop.ScreenSaver /ScreenSaver org.freedesktop.ScreenSaver.SetActive True Also can be done with: $ /usr/lib/kde4/libexec/kscreenlocker --forcelock

Print names of all video files encoded with h264

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Colored SVN diff
Simple way to achieve a colored SVN diff

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Probably, most frequent use of diff
This form is used in patches, svn, git etc. And I've created an alias for it: alias diff='diff -Naur --strip-trailing-cr' The latter option is especially useful, when somebody in team works in Windows; could be also used in commands like $ svn diff --diff-cmd 'diff --strip-trailing-cr'...

dump a single table of a database to file

Simple server which listens on a port and prints out received data
Sometimes you need a simple server which listens on a port and prints out received data. Example: Consider you want to know, which data is posted by a homepage to a remote script without analysing the html code! A simple way to do this is to save the page to your computer, substitude all action="address" with action="localhost:portnumber", run 'ncat -l portnumber' and open the edited page with your browser. If you then submit the form, ncat will print out the http-protocol with all the posted data.


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