Commands tagged user (9)

  • Usage exaple cmd echo 'Sure to continue ??'; read -n1 choi; if [ "$choi" = 'y' ] || [ "$choi" = 'Y' ]; then echo -e '\nExecuting..'; else echo 'Aborted'; fi Show Sample Output


    6
    read -N1
    totti · 2013-10-10 10:09:43 1

  • 2
    killall -u username
    bugmenot · 2011-11-24 20:26:38 0
  • Requires consolekit (works in e.g. Ubuntu). Here x11-display is DISPLAY Show Sample Output


    1
    ck-list-sessions
    unhammer · 2012-01-02 08:53:41 0
  • As a user, deletes all your posts from a MyBB board (provided you have the search page listings of all your posts saved into the same directory this command is run from). Full command: for i in *; do cat $i | grep pid | sed -e 's/;/\ /g' -e 's/#/\ /g' -e 's/pid=/\ /g' | awk -F ' ' '{print $2}' >> posts.txt; done; for c in `cat posts.txt`; do curl --cookie name= --data-urlencode name=my_post_key=\&delete=1\&submit=Delete+Now\&action=deletepost\&pid=$c --user-agent Firefox\ 3.5 --url http://url/editpost.php?my_post_key=\&delete=1\&submit=Delete+Now\&action=deletepost\&pid=$c; sleep 2s; done; echo


    0
    curl --cookie name=<cookie_value> --data-urlencode name=my_post_key=<post_key>\&delete=1\&submit=Delete+Now\&action=deletepost\&pid=$c --user-agent Firefox\ 3.5 --url http://url/editpost.php?my_post_key=<post_key>\&delete=1\&submit=Delete+Now\&action=dele
    mrlockfs · 2010-07-14 01:50:48 0
  • Function: char * crypt (const char *key, const char *salt) The crypt function takes a password, key, as a string, and a salt character array which is described below, and returns a printable ASCII string which starts with another salt. It is believed that, given the output of the function, the best way to find a key that will produce that output is to guess values of key until the original value of key is found. The salt parameter does two things. Firstly, it selects which algorithm is used, the MD5-based one or the DES-based one. Secondly, it makes life harder for someone trying to guess passwords against a file containing many passwords; without a salt, an intruder can make a guess, run crypt on it once, and compare the result with all the passwords. With a salt, the intruder must run crypt once for each different salt. For the MD5-based algorithm, the salt should consist of the string $1$, followed by up to 8 characters, terminated by either another $ or the end of the string. The result of crypt will be the salt, followed by a $ if the salt didn't end with one, followed by 22 characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, up to 34 characters total. Every character in the key is significant. For the DES-based algorithm, the salt should consist of two characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, and the result of crypt will be those two characters followed by 11 more from the same alphabet, 13 in total. Only the first 8 characters in the key are significant. Show Sample Output


    0
    useradd -m -p $(perl -e'print crypt("pass", "mb")') user
    mariusbutuc · 2010-09-03 19:00:56 0
  • This command is Linux compatible. It will prompt the user for a new password at next logon


    0
    chage -d 0 -m 0 -M 60 [user]
    mack · 2011-04-28 02:19:59 0
  • This command is AIX compatible. It will prompt the user for a new password at next logon


    0
    pwdadm -f ADMCHG [user]
    mack · 2011-04-28 02:22:03 0
  • cut -f1,2 - IP range 16 cut -f1,2,3 - IP range 24 cut -f1,2,3,4 - IP range 24 Show Sample Output


    0
    netstat -tn | grep :80 | awk '{print $5}'| grep -v ':80' | cut -f1 -d: |cut -f1,2,3 -d. | sort | uniq -c| sort -n
    krishnan · 2012-06-26 08:29:37 0
  • Install with `npm install unix-permissions`. https://github.com/ehmicky/unix-permissions Unix file permissions can take many shapes: symbolic (`ug+rw`), octal (`660`) or a list of characters (`drw-rw----`). `unix-permissions` enables using any of these (instead of being limited to a single one) with any CLI command. Show Sample Output


    -1
    unix-permissions convert.stat $(unix-permissions invert $(umask))
    ehmicky · 2019-02-05 14:06:08 0

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Backup files incremental with rsync to a NTFS-Partition
This will backup the _contents_ of /media/SOURCE to /media/TARGET where TARGET is formatted with ntfs. The --modify-window lets rsync ignore the less accurate timestamps of NTFS.

bash/ksh function: given a file, cd to the directory it lives
fcd : file change directory A bash function that takes a fully qualified file path and cd's into the directory where it lives. Useful on the commadline when you have a file name in a variable and you'd like to cd to the directory to RCS check it in or look at other files associated with it. Will run on any ksh, bash, likely sh, maybe zsh.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Find the package that installed a command

Read info(1) pages using 'less' instead of GNU Texinfo
I like man pages, and I like using `less(1)` as my pager. However, most GNU software keeps the manual in the 'GNU Texinfo' format, and I'm not a fan of the info(1) interface. Just give me less. This command will print out the info(1) pages, using the familiar interface of less!

Show the UUID of a filesystem or partition
Shows the UUID of the given partition (here /dev/sda7). Doesn't need to be root.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Connect via sftp to a specific port
I use this for connect via sftp to a server listening on a non default ssh port.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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