All commands (12,617)

  • additionally use "find /etc/cron*" for cronscripts Show Sample Output


    1
    cut -d: -f1 /etc/passwd | grep -vE "#" | xargs -i{} crontab -u {} -l
    hoberion · 2009-06-18 16:49:52 2
  • Sometimes you're trying to read through an xml file to determine whats wrong with it and a tool had removed all the linebreaks. xmllint will go ahead and make it pretty for you.


    4
    xmllint --format <filename> > <output file>
    topperge · 2009-06-18 15:00:30 0

  • 0
    shred -vzu /tmp/junk-file-to-be-shredded
    mpb · 2009-06-18 12:00:19 2
  • imports a public key from the web. I know this by head.. but useful nevertheless Show Sample Output


    2
    curl -s http://defekt.nl/~jelle/pubkey.asc | gpg --import
    wires · 2009-06-18 11:26:03 0
  • Appended to grub boot parameters ... gives shell ... password recovery


    2
    init=/bin/bash; mount -o remount,rw /
    m03hr3 · 2009-06-18 08:51:24 0
  • I had some trouble removing empty lines from a file (perhaps due to utf-8, as it's the source of all evil), \W did the trick eventually.


    0
    grep -v "^\W$" <filename>
    nikc · 2009-06-18 08:17:22 2

  • 2
    find directory -size +nnn
    miccaman · 2009-06-18 06:55:00 0

  • 1
    ls -s | sort -nr | more
    miccaman · 2009-06-18 06:44:01 3
  • Starts midnightcommander and allows you to detach the console; use ctrl-\ to detach Then at a later time you can reconnect using dtach -a /tmp/wires-mc In my experience dtach works much better for programs like irssi, mutt, mc, aptitude than screen does.


    5
    dtach -c /tmp/wires-mc mc
    wires · 2009-06-17 22:18:25 4
  • search the newest *.jpg in the directory an make a copy to newest.jpg. Just change the extension to search other files. This is usefull eg. if your webcam saves all pictures in a folder and you like the put the last one on your homepage. This works even in a directory with 10000 pictures.


    1
    cp `ls -x1tr *.jpg | tail -n 1` newest.jpg
    Psychodad · 2009-06-17 20:32:04 3
  • Using the grep command, retrieve all lines from any log files in /var/log/ that have one of the problem states


    6
    grep -2 -iIr "err\|warn\|fail\|crit" /var/log/*
    miketheman · 2009-06-17 19:41:04 2
  • This will create a 10 MB file named testfile.txt. Change the count parameter to change the size of the file. As one commenter pointed out, yes /dev/random can be used, but the content doesn't matter if you just need a file of a specific size for testing purposes, which is why I used /dev/zero. The file size is what matters, not the content. It's 10 MB either way. "Random" just referred to "any file - content not specific" Show Sample Output


    1
    dd if=/dev/zero of=testfile.txt bs=1M count=10
    mstoecker · 2009-06-17 17:06:16 7

  • 2
    qlook() { qlmanage -p "$@" >& /dev/null & }
    mikedamage · 2009-06-17 16:02:34 0

  • 7
    pbpaste > newfile.txt
    mikedamage · 2009-06-17 15:14:22 2
  • Makes any files in the current directory (and any sub-directories) group-readable. Using the "! -perm /g=r" limits the number of files to only those that do not already have this property Using "+" on the end of the -exec body tells find to build the entire command by appending all matching files before execution, so invokes chmod once only, not once per file.


    3
    find . -type f ! -perm /g=r -exec chmod g+r {} +
    sanmiguel · 2009-06-17 13:39:59 0
  • Makes it easy to add keys to new ppa sources entries in apt sources.list Now to add the key for the chromium-daily ppa: launchpadkey 4E5E17B5 Show Sample Output


    8
    alias launchpadkey="sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys"
    azeey · 2009-06-17 12:02:27 3
  • Useful if you have to put together multiple files into one and they are scattered across subdirectories. For example: You need to combine all .sql files into one .sql file that would be sent to DBAs as a batch script. You do get a warning if you create a file by the same extension as the ones your searching for. find . -type f -name *.sql -exec cat {} > BatchFile.txt \;


    4
    find . -type f -name *.ext -exec cat {} > file.txt \;
    realgt · 2009-06-17 11:33:14 6
  • There are two ways to use "here documents" with bash to fill stdin: The following example shows use with the "bc" command. a) Using a delimiter at the end of data: less-than less-than eeooff bc > k=1024 > m=k*k > g=k*m > g > eeooff 1073741824 b) using the "inline" verion with three less-than symbols: less-than less-than less-than "k=1024; m=k*k; g=k*m; g" bc 1073741824 One nice advantage of using the triple less-than version is that the command can easily be recalled from command line history and re-executed. PS: in this "description", I had to use the name "less-than" to represent the less-than symbol because the commandlinefu input text box seems to eat up the real less-than symbols. Odd. Show Sample Output


    9
    <<<"k=1024; m=k*k; g=k*m; g" bc
    mpb · 2009-06-17 10:35:10 5
  • You need sysstat and gawk for this to work. Show Sample Output


    0
    for x in `seq -w 1 30`; do sar -b -f /var/log/sa/sa$x | gawk '/Average/ {print $2}'; done
    unixmonkey4319 · 2009-06-17 02:46:52 0
  • This set of commands was very convenient for me when I was preparing some xml files for typesetting a book. I wanted to check what styles I had to prepare but coudn't remember all tags that I used. This one saved me from error-prone browsing of all my files. It should be also useful if one tries to process xml files with xsl, when using own xml application.


    2
    grep -h -o '<[^/!?][^ >]*' * | sort -u | cut -c2-
    thebodzio · 2009-06-17 00:22:18 5
  • In the above example all files have 4 lines. In "file1" consecutive lines are: "num, 1, 2, 3", in "file2": "name, Jack, Jim, Frank" and in "file3": "scores, 1300, 1100, 980". This one liner can save considerate ammount of time when you're trying to process serious portions of data. "-d" option allows one to set series of characters to be used as separators between data originating from given files. Show Sample Output


    8
    paste -d ',:' file1 file2 file3
    thebodzio · 2009-06-17 00:11:04 5
  • find all email addresses in a file, printing each match. Addresses do not have to be alone on a line etc. For example you can grab them from HTML-formatted emails or CSV files, etc. Use a combination of ...|sort|uniq$ to filter them. Show Sample Output


    3
    grep -Eio '([[:alnum:]_.]+@[[:alnum:]_]+?\.[[:alpha:].]{2,6})' file.html
    wires · 2009-06-16 20:19:47 0
  • Search for the string "search" and replace it with the string "replace", on all files with the extension php in the curret folder. Do also a backup of each file with the extension "bkp".


    4
    ruby -i.bkp -pe "gsub(/search/, 'replace')" *.php
    gustavgans · 2009-06-16 12:35:40 1
  • Good for summing the numbers embedded in text - a food journal entry for example with calories listed per food where you want the total calories. Use this to monitor and keep a total on anything that ouputs numbers. Show Sample Output


    3
    perl -ne '$sum += $_ for grep { /\d+/ } split /[^\d\-\.]+/; print "$sum\n"'
    obscurite · 2009-06-16 06:39:08 1
  • This command will open up the two files in FileMerge on OS X. You can also compare two directories. opendiff directory1 directory2 NOTE: FileMerge is a part of the OS X Developer Tools, available on the install disc.


    -3
    opendiff <file1> <file2>
    claytron · 2009-06-16 03:22:52 3
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