Commands matching ls (1,226)

  • This is an alternative to cron which allows a one-off task to be scheduled for a certain time.


    249
    echo "ls -l" | at midnight
    root · 2009-01-25 21:07:42 13
  • A nice way to use the console in full screen without forget the current time. you can too add other infos like cpu and mem use. Show Sample Output


    125
    while sleep 1;do tput sc;tput cup 0 $(($(tput cols)-29));date;tput rc;done &
    glaudiston · 2011-02-17 11:13:19 12

  • 91
    lsof -i
    hank · 2009-04-25 14:24:04 7

  • 90
    lsof -P -i -n
    OJM · 2009-09-19 18:28:48 1
  • Prints a graphical directory tree from your current directory Show Sample Output


    58
    ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g' -e 's/^/ /' -e 's/-/|/'
    unixmonkey842 · 2009-02-15 20:43:21 3
  • This is the result of a several week venture without X. I found myself totally happy without X (and by extension without flash) and was able to do just about anything but watch YouTube videos... so this a the solution I came up with for that. I am sure this can be done better but this does indeed work... and tends to work far better than YouTube's ghetto proprietary flash player ;-) Replace $i with any YouTube ID you want and this will scrape the site for the _real_ URL to the full quality .FLV file on Youtube's server and will then will hand that over to mplayer (or vlc or whatever you want) to be streamed. In some browsers you can replace $i with just a % or put this in a shell script so all YouTube IDs can be handed directly off to your media player of choice for true streaming without the need for Flash or a downloader like clive. (I do however fully recommend clive if you wish to archive videos instead of streaming them) If any interest is shown I would be more than happy to provide similar commands for other sites. Most streaming flash players use similar logic to YouTube. Edit: 05/03/2011 - Updated line to work with current YouTube. It could be a lot prettier but I will probably follow up with another update when I figure out how to get rid of that pesky Grep. Sed should take that syntax... but it doesn't. Original (no longer working) command: mplayer -fs $(echo "http://youtube.com/get_video.php?$(curl -s $youtube_url | sed -n "/watch_fullscreen/s;.*\(video_id.\+\)&title.*;\1;p")") Show Sample Output


    57
    i="8uyxVmdaJ-w";mplayer -fs $(curl -s "http://www.youtube.com/get_video_info?&video_id=$i" | echo -e $(sed 's/%/\\x/g;s/.*\(v[0-9]\.lscache.*\)/http:\/\/\1/g') | grep -oP '^[^|,]*')
    lrvick · 2009-03-09 03:57:44 15
  • 'dpkg -S' just matches the string you supply it, so just using 'ls' as an argument matches any file from any package that has 'ls' anywhere in the filename. So usually it's a good idea to use an absolute path. You can see in the second example that 12 thousand files that are known to dpkg match the bare string 'ls'. Show Sample Output


    45
    dpkg -S /usr/bin/ls
    bwoodacre · 2009-04-18 18:18:23 11
  • This command takes a snapshot of the open files for a PID 1234 then waits 10 seconds and takes another snapshot of the same PID, it then displays the difference between each snapshot to give you an insight into what the application is doing.


    38
    diff <(lsof -p 1234) <(sleep 10; lsof -p 1234)
    zlemini · 2010-03-15 22:55:32 1
  • -d: list directory entries instead of contents, and do not dereference symbolic links


    38
    ls -d */
    brianmuckian · 2009-10-08 22:07:22 1
  • parse `lsmod' output and pass to `dot' drawing utility then finally pass it to an image viewer


    35
    lsmod | perl -e 'print "digraph \"lsmod\" {";<>;while(<>){@_=split/\s+/; print "\"$_[0]\" -> \"$_\"\n" for split/,/,$_[3]}print "}"' | dot -Tpng | display -
    bandie91 · 2011-11-27 14:02:35 12
  • Sometimes you need to use a port that is already opened by some program , and you don't know who to "kill" for it to release - so, now you do ! Show Sample Output


    35
    lsof -i tcp:80
    ar_levi · 2009-04-16 14:51:53 7
  • show only the name of the apps that are using internet Show Sample Output


    32
    lsof -P -i -n | cut -f 1 -d " "| uniq | tail -n +2
    edo · 2009-09-19 21:23:54 2
  • Negative shell globs already come with bash. Make sure to turn on extended pattern matching with 'shopt -e extglob'.


    31
    ls !(*.gz)
    c0t0d0 · 2010-07-29 23:47:26 1
  • You have an external USB drive or key. Apply this command (using the file path of anything on your device) and it will simulate the unplug of this device. If you just want the port, just type : echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-") Show Sample Output


    30
    echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-") | sudo tee /sys/bus/usb/drivers/usb/unbind
    tweet78 · 2014-04-06 12:06:29 9
  • This command is more portable than it's cousin netstat. It works well on all the BSDs, GNU/Linux, AIX and Mac OS X. You won't find lsof by default on Solaris or HPUX by default, but packages exist around the web for installation, if needed, and the command works as shown. This is the most portable command I can find that lists listening ports and their associated pid. Show Sample Output


    29
    lsof -Pan -i tcp -i udp
    atoponce · 2010-06-07 15:22:44 0
  • After the command is done, open the html file in a browser


    28
    lshw -html > hardware.html
    flart · 2009-06-04 07:14:03 6
  • (relies on 'imagemagick') This command will convert all .pdf files in a directory into a 800px (wide or height, whichever is smaller) image (with the aspect ratio kept) .jpg. If the file is named 'example1.pdf' it will be named 'example1.jpg' when it is complete. This is a VERY worthwhile command! People pay hundreds of dollars for this in the Windows world. My .jpg files average between 150kB to 300kB, but your's may differ. Show Sample Output


    28
    for file in `ls *.pdf`; do convert -verbose -colorspace RGB -resize 800 -interlace none -density 300 -quality 80 $file `echo $file | sed 's/\.pdf$/\.jpg/'`; done
    brettalton · 2009-02-15 23:27:43 4
  • the -x option is for binding to a shell command


    27
    bind -x '"\C-l":ls -l'
    roalddevries · 2010-12-25 22:55:33 1
  • I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him Show Sample Output


    26
    diff <(lsusb) <(sleep 3s && lsusb)
    Juluan · 2010-12-27 22:46:54 1
  • List all file opened by a particular command based on it's command name. Show Sample Output


    25
    lsof -c dhcpd
    d4n3sh · 2009-04-17 07:18:38 0
  • Now type Ctrl-l and it will list all files


    23
    bind '"\C-l":"ls -l\n"'
    strzel_a · 2010-11-19 09:14:16 5

  • 23
    ls -Q
    stubby · 2010-08-17 15:01:50 1
  • I like the fact the Patola's version uses only ones and zeros, but I also like the sparse output of the other versions. This one combines both of those features and eliminates some unnecessary cruft. You can vary the sparseness by changing "$(($RANDOM % 5))" to another number. The number in this term "$(($RANDOM % 4))" controls how frequently the numbers are output bold.


    22
    echo -e "\e[32m"; while :; do for i in {1..16}; do r="$(($RANDOM % 2))"; if [[ $(($RANDOM % 5)) == 1 ]]; then if [[ $(($RANDOM % 4)) == 1 ]]; then v+="\e[1m $r "; else v+="\e[2m $r "; fi; else v+=" "; fi; done; echo -e "$v"; v=""; done
    dennisw · 2009-09-27 15:30:38 2
  • I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog' Show Sample Output


    21
    ls -hog
    haivu · 2009-03-21 05:24:49 0
  • This command handles git rm'ing files that you've deleted. Show Sample Output


    21
    git rm $(git ls-files --deleted)
    technicalpickles · 2009-02-26 21:21:02 1
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tar directory and compress it with showing progress and Disk IO limits
tar directory and compress it with showing progress and Disk IO limits. Pipe Viewer can be used to view the progress of the task, Besides, he can limit the disk IO, especially useful for running Servers.

Another Matrix Style Implementation
A bit different from some of the other submissions. Has bold and uses all c printable characters. Change the bs=value to speed up and increase the sizes of the bold and non-bold strings.

Get a regular updated list of zombies
to omit "grep -v", put some brackets around a single character

start a vnc server session to connect to a gdm login screen

Insert the last argument of the previous command

Show established network connections

Viewing Top Processes according to cpu, mem, swap size, etc.
I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead. If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html $ aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; }

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Adding Prefix to File name

route output as next command's parameters


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