Commands using man (66)

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Downmix from stereo to mono and play radio stream with mplayer
The solution to a year long (and extremely frustrating) problem I've had, caused by the fact that I only have one speaker; this command downmixes the stream to monophonic output, making sure I don't miss any of the music. NOTE: When stream is in .m3u format, a -playlist option is required, as shown below: $ mplayer -af pan=1:0.5:0.5 -channels 1 -playlist radiostream.m3u This command works great with aliases for various channels in .bashrc. Sample below: $ alias radio1='mplayer -af pan=1:0.5:0.5 -channels 1 radio1stream.pls'

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

create a progress bar...
A simple way yo do a progress bar like wget.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Get your external IP address
Yeah I know it's been up here a million times, but this service is a really clean and nice one. Nothing but your IP address on it. Actually I was to write something like this, and noticed this on appspot... ;)

Insert an element into xml
This inserts an element as last child under /breakfast_menu/food in simple.xml. xml used - http://www.w3schools.com/xml/simple.xml

Transfer large files/directories with no overhead over the network
This invokes tar on the remote machine and pipes the resulting tarfile over the network using ssh and is saved on the local machine. This is useful for making a one-off backup of a directory tree with zero storage overhead on the source. Variations on this include using compression on the source by using 'tar cfvp' or compression at the destination via $ ssh [email protected] "cd dir; tar cfp - *" | gzip - > file.tar.gz

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

I hate `echo X | Y`
apart from not being generalisable to all shells, `Y <<< X` seems nicer to me than `echo X | Y`, e.g. $ <<< lol cat; it reads easier, you type less, and it also looks cool

extract email adresses from some file (or any other pattern)
find all email addresses in a file, printing each match. Addresses do not have to be alone on a line etc. For example you can grab them from HTML-formatted emails or CSV files, etc. Use a combination of $...|sort|uniq$ to filter them.


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