Commands tagged git (138)

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grep (or anything else) many files with multiprocessor power
xargs -P N spawns up to N worker processes. -n 40 means each grep command gets up to 40 file names each on the command line.

Resume a detached screen session, resizing to fit the current terminal
By default, screen tries to restore its old window sizes when attaching to resizable terminals. This command is the command-line equivalent to typing ^A F to fit an open screen session to the window.

Find where a kind of file is stored
In this case searches for where .desktop files are stored. The resulted is a sorted list of the top directories containing such files.

Unencrypted voicechat
Sends the microphone input from PC1 to the speakers of PC2. Do the same in reverse to have an actual conversation ;) ... maybe with another port tough

Given a file path, unplug the USB device on which the file is located (the file must be on an USB device !)
You have an external USB drive or key. Apply this command (using the file path of anything on your device) and it will simulate the unplug of this device. If you just want the port, just type : echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-")

Get a MySQL DB dump from a remote machine
This command will dump a database on a remote stream to stdout, compress it, stream it to your local machine, decompress it and put it into a file called database.sql.You could even pipe it into mysql on your local machine to restore it immediately. I had to use this recently because the server I needed a backup from didn't have enough disk space.

Get yesterday's date or a previous time
With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins? touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me List all directories created since last week? touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

Tweak system files without invoking a root shell
only for sudo-style systems. Use this construct instead of I/O re-directors ``>'' or ``>>'' because sudo only elevates the commands and *not* the re-directors. ***warning: remember that the `tee` command will clobber file contents unless it is given the ``-a'' argument Also, for extra security, the "left" command is still run unprivileged.

ISO info
Get details about an ISO image , without burning it or mounting it .

Create a quick back-up copy of a file
Uses shell expansion to create a back-up called file.txt.bak


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