Commands using wget (284)

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Show one line summaries of all DEB packages installed on Ubuntu based on pattern search
I sometimes want to know what packages are installed on my Ubuntu system. I still haven't figured out how to use aptitude effectively, so this is the next best thing. This allows finding by name. The grep '^ii' limits the display to only installed packages. If this is not specified, then it includes listing of non-installed packages as well.

See n most used commands in your bash history
You can append these commands to the bottom of the history file to access them easier with the Up key: $ sort ~/.bash_history|uniq -c|sort -n|tail -n 10|tr -s " "|cut -d' ' -f3- >> ~/.bash_history

Google text-to-speech in local language or language of choice
Google text-to-speech in your local language or in language of choice via country code switch (ISO 639-1).

Quickly build ulimit command from current values
It is helpful to know the current limits placed on your account, and using this shortcut is a quick way to figuring out which values to change for optimization or security. Alias is: $ alias ulimith="command ulimit -a|sed 's/^.*\([a-z]\))\(.*\)$/-\1\2/;s/^/ulimit /'|tr '\n' ' ';echo" Here's the result of this command: $ ulimit -c 0 -d unlimited -e 0 -f unlimited -i 155648 -l 32 -m unlimited -n 8192 -p 8 -q 819200 -r 0 -s 10240 -t unlimited -u unlimited -v unlimited -x unlimited $ ulimit -a core file size (blocks, -c) 0 data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited scheduling priority (-e) 0 file size (blocks, -f) unlimited pending signals (-i) 155648 max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 32 max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited open files (-n) 8192 pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8 POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200 real-time priority (-r) 0 stack size (kbytes, -s) 10240 cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited max user processes (-u) unlimited virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited file locks (-x) unlimited

prevent large files from being cached in memory (backups!)
We all know... $ nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   $ ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do $ cachedel   To check the cache status of a file, do $ cachestats

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

video volume boost

Show the key code for keyboard events include the Fn keys
The keycodes are a result of pressing: Mute (Fn+F1) a


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