Commands using alias (213)


  • 1
    alias man='man -S 2:3:1'
    kev · 2012-03-29 12:02:47 2
  • Run the alias command, then issue ps aux | tail and resize your terminal window (putty/console/hyperterm/xterm/etc) then issue the same command and you'll understand. ${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`} Insructs the shell that if LINES is not set or null to use the output from `tput lines` ( ncurses based terminal access ) to get the number of lines in your terminal. But furthermore, in case that doesn't work either, it will default to using the default of 80. The default for TAIL is to output the last 10 lines, this alias changes the default to output the last x lines instead, where x is the number of lines currently displayed on your terminal - 7. The -7 is there so that the top line displayed is the command you ran that used TAIL, ie the prompt. Depending on whether your PS1 and/or PROMPT_COMMAND output more than 1 line (mine is 3) you will want to increase from -2. So with my prompt being the following, I need -7, or - 5 if I only want to display the commandline at the top. ( http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html ) 275MB/748MB [7995:7993 - 0:186] 06:26:49 Thu Apr 08 [askapache@n1-backbone5:/dev/pts/0 +1] ~ In most shells the LINES variable is created automatically at login and updated when the terminal is resized (28 linux, 23/20 others for SIGWINCH) to contain the number of vertical lines that can fit in your terminal window. Because the alias doesn't hard-code the current LINES but relys on the $LINES variable, this is a dynamic alias that will always work on a tty device. Show Sample Output


    2
    alias tail='tail -n $((${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 80`} - 7))'
    AskApache · 2012-03-22 02:44:11 2
  • Changes machine and cd to specific directory Add to .*shrc Usage : sshto


    0
    alias sshto 'ssh -X -t \!:1 "cd \!:2 ; tcsh"'
    pranavkn · 2012-03-20 20:07:37 0
  • If you want to carry on your aliases while using sudo, put this into a file which will be parsed when logging in. Show Sample Output


    0
    alias sudo='sudo '
    Testuser_01 · 2012-03-04 20:02:38 0
  • sort is way slow by default. This tells sort to use a buffer equal to half of the available free memory. It also will use multiple process for the sort equal to the number of cpus on your machine (if greater than 1). For me, it is magnitudes faster. If you put this in your bash_profile or startup file, it will be set correctly when bash is started. sort -S1 --parallel=2 <(echo) &>/dev/null && alias sortfast='sort -S$(($(sed '\''/MemF/!d;s/[^0-9]*//g'\'' /proc/meminfo)/2048)) $([ `nproc` -gt 1 ]&&echo -n --parallel=`nproc`)' Alternative echo|sort -S10M --parallel=2 &>/dev/null && alias sortfast="command sort -S$(($(sed '/MemT/!d;s/[^0-9]*//g' /proc/meminfo)/1024-200)) --parallel=$(($(command grep -c ^proc /proc/cpuinfo)*2))" Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sortfast='sort -S$(($(sed '\''/MemF/!d;s/[^0-9]*//g'\'' /proc/meminfo)/2048)) $([ `nproc` -gt 1 ]&&echo -n --parallel=`nproc`)'
    AskApache · 2012-02-28 01:34:58 3
  • To prevent accidental deleting of files you can disable rm with this alias. Then use the trash command from trash-cli instead.


    0
    alias rm='echo "rm is disabled, use trash or /bin/rm instead."'
    captaincomic · 2012-01-27 03:11:45 0
  • The command creates an alias called 'path', so it's useful to add it to your .profile or .bash_profile. The path command then prints the full path of any file, directory, or list of files given. Soft links will be resolved to their true location. This is especially useful if you use scp often to copy files across systems. Now rather then using pwd to get a directory, and then doing a separate cut and paste to get a file's name, you can just type 'path file' and get the full path in one operation. Show Sample Output


    1
    alias path="/usr/bin/perl -e 'use Cwd; foreach my \$file (@ARGV) {print Cwd::abs_path(\$file) .\"\n\" if(-e \$file);}'"
    espider1 · 2012-01-18 01:40:05 1
  • use xdg-open without looking at error messages examples msg: (nautilus:3955): Gtk-WARNING **: Theme parsing error: Notebook.css:21:15: Junk at end of value


    -3
    alias o='xdg-open "$@" 2>/dev/null'
    Bonster · 2011-12-26 08:52:22 2
  • Alias to play flash videos with mplayer. You can replace mplayer with your favorite video player. This alias supports Chrome & Firefox's way of handling the flash plugin. It will play all the videos in the cache. Note that certain videos might never make it to the cache, if the publisher ask for them not to: they will just be loaded in RAM. A variant if you're just interested in playing the audio, for example for a music : alias flashmusic="mplayer -vo null \$(find /proc/\$(pgrep -f 'libgcfl|libflashplayer')/fd/ -printf '%p %l\n' |grep FlashXX | cut -d\ -f1)"


    0
    alias flashplay="mplayer \$(find /proc/\$(pgrep -f 'libgcflash|libflashplayer')/fd/ -printf '%p %l\n' |grep FlashXX | cut -d\ -f1)"
    Aissen · 2011-12-19 09:29:57 0
  • requires a gmail account, it opens Google tasks in a self contain window, to write your todo list and have it sync online yay =)


    -4
    alias gtasks='chromium-browser --app=https://mail.google.com/tasks/ig'
    Bonster · 2011-12-05 22:11:00 0
  • Syntax outside of an alias would be printf %b \\033c. This clears the screen and removes scrollback. Works on gnome-terminal and the XFCE's Terminal, and XTerm. It does clear the screen in Konsole and the Mac Terminal, but does not clear scrollback.


    0
    alias cls='printf %b '\''\033c'\'''
    robinsonaarond · 2011-11-01 14:31:30 0
  • Uses printf command to resize terminal. So far, this is tested to NOT work in Konsole. Works with Mac Terminal, XFCE Terminal, XTerm, gnome-terminal.


    0
    alias mid='printf "\e[8;24;80;t"'
    robinsonaarond · 2011-11-01 14:25:45 0
  • Creates an alias that reports your hostname and IP for you computer. Getting the quotes in an alias with awk commands can be a painful. Need uname and ifconfig--both are included in most unix distributions, I believe. Hope it is useful. Show Sample Output


    0
    alias me="echo '`ifconfig | grep inet | grep broadcast | awk '{print $2}'`' && uname -n"
    timrand · 2011-10-30 19:36:42 1

  • -21
    alias ..='cd ..'
    kev · 2011-10-28 10:12:57 8
  • I put this line in my ~/.bashrc file (which I source via ~/.bash_profile). Now, when I need to install a package, I typed *install* instead of the longer version.


    -6
    alias install='sudo apt-get install'
    haivu · 2011-10-27 19:53:01 9
  • use python as calculator, press ctrl+d to exit reminder: when doing factions add atleast one decimal number like so 22.0/7 or 22/7.0 Show Sample Output


    0
    alias calc='python -ic "from math import *; from random import *"'
    Bonster · 2011-10-24 08:15:41 0
  • Prints out the list of date(1) format codes, for quick easy reference. dateformatcodes Show Sample Output


    0
    alias dateformatcodes="date --help | sed -n '/^FORMAT/,/%Z/p'"
    defiantredpill · 2011-10-20 17:43:36 0
  • Enhancement for the 'busy' command originally posted by busybee : less chars, no escape issue, and most important it exclude small files ( opening a 5 lines file isn't that persuasive I think ;) ) This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim.


    0
    alias busy='rnd_file=$(find /usr/include -type f -size +5k | sort -R | head -n 1) && vim +$((RANDOM%$(wc -l $rnd_file | cut -f1 -d" "))) $rnd_file'
    frntn · 2011-10-16 00:05:59 0
  • cn stands for "Cat Null" . The idea is that sometimes you run across something on maybe a webpage - like commandlinefu - that you want to try out on your terminal. You could put a '#' in and then paste it, but what if it is several lines? . This command will echo the pasted characters to the screen and divert them to the bit bucket. . Put this simple alias in your .bashrc, hit cn, paste away, and hit a ctrl+c or a ctrl+d when you are done to get your prompt back. Show Sample Output


    -3
    alias cn='cat > /dev/null'
    unixmonkey365 · 2011-09-16 00:00:28 1

  • -1
    alias oports="echo -e "User:\tCommand:\tPort:\n----------------------------" && lsof -i 4 -P -n | awk '/LISTEN/ {print $3, $1, $9}' | sed 's/ [a-z0-9\.\*]*:/ /' | sort -u -k 3 -n | xargs printf '%-10s %-10s %-10s\n'"
    rthemocap · 2011-08-04 16:39:04 1
  • another formatting/oneliner for lsof User - Process - Port Show Sample Output


    3
    alias oports="echo 'User: Command: Port:'; echo '----------------------------' ; lsof -i 4 -P -n | grep -i 'listen' | awk '{print \$3, \$1, \$9}' | sed 's/ [a-z0-9\.\*]*:/ /' | sort -k 3 -n |xargs printf '%-10s %-10s %-10s\n' | uniq"
    wickedcpj · 2011-08-02 04:54:25 0

  • 0
    alias cd1='cd $( ls -1t | grep ^d | head -1)'
    frOOgz · 2011-07-22 18:56:37 0

  • 1
    alias cps="ps -u root U `whoami` --forest -o pid,stat,tty,user,command |ccze -m ansi"
    crisidev · 2011-07-13 21:00:06 0
  • This alias is meant to append n (here is n=10) most recently used cd commands to the bottom of history file. This way you can easily change to one of previous visited directories simply by hitting 1-10 times arrow up key. Hint: You can make more aliases implying the same rule for any set of frequently used long and complex commands like: mkisof, rdesktop, gpg...


    1
    alias cdd="history -a && grep '^ *[0-9]* *cd ' ~/.bash_history| tail -10 >>~/.bash_history && history -r ~/.bash_history"
    knoppix5 · 2011-07-13 09:44:16 0
  • Put the function in your .bashrc and use "map [alias]" to create the alias you want. Just be careful to not override an existing alias. Show Sample Output


    1
    map() { if [ "$1" != "" ]; then alias $1="cd `pwd`"; fi }
    javidjamae · 2011-07-11 15:46:19 2
  •  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: