Commands using dd (167)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

generate 30 x 30 matrix
or $ od /dev/urandom -w60 -An|sed 's/ ..../ /g'|head -n 30 (this one lacks digits 8 and 9)

Download entire website for offline viewing
?mirror : turn on options suitable for mirroring. -p : download all files that are necessary to properly display a given HTML page. ?convert-links : after the download, convert the links in document for local viewing. -P ./LOCAL-DIR : save all the files and directories to the specified directory.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Position the cursor under the current directory line
In case you're like me and like your commands to start on clean lines, especially when you're deep into a 10-level directory tree. This can be added to .bashrc.

Switch to the previous branch used in git(1)
Very useful if you keep switching between the same two branches all the time.

Forwards connections to your port 2000 to the port 22 of a remote host via ssh tunnel

Print a monthly calendar with today's date highlighted
The cal command is handy, but sometimes you want to quickly see today's date highlighted. That's why I came up with this quick command. Much like http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1342/show-this-months-calendar-with-todays-date-highlighted but cleaner and more succinct.

Top ten (or whatever) memory utilizing processes (with children aggregate) - Can be done without the multi-dimensional array

print/scan lines starting at record ###
Useful for finding newly added lines to a file, tail + can be used to show only the lines starting at some offset. A syslog scanner would look at the file for the first time, then record the end_of_file record number using wc -l. Later (hours, days), scan only at the lines that were added since the last scan.

Remove the first character of each line in a file


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: