Commands tagged ssh (188)

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Write on the console without being registered
just use a space to prevent commands from being recorded in bash's history on most systems

Yet Another Rename (bash function)
Implementation of `rename` for systems on which I don't have access to it.

which process has a port open

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

a for loop with filling 0 format, with seq
seq allows you to format the output thanks to the -f option. This is very useful if you want to rename your files to the same format in order to be able to easily sort for example: $for i in `seq 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done And $ls foo* | sort -n foo1 foo10 foo4 foo7 But: $for i in `seq -f %02g 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done So $ls foo* | sort -n foo01 foo04 foo07 foo10

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Preview of a picture in a terminal
This command allows you to see a preview of a picture via the terminal. It can be usefull when you are ssh'ing your server without X-forwarding. To have en example of the output you can get with this command see http://www.vimeo.com/3721117 Download at http://inouire.net/image-couleur.html Sources here: http://inouire.net/archives/image-couleur_source.tar.gz

reverse order of file

Print all 256 colors for testing TERM or for a quick reference
This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output. $ tset xterm-256color at any rate that is some super lean code! Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile aa_256 () { ( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`; for i in {0..256}; do o=00$i; echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x; done ) } From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Download a numbered sequence of files


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