Commands tagged Debian (99)

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a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

shortcut to scp a file to the same location on a remote machine
This will copy a file from your current directory to the same location on another machine. Handy for configuring ha, copying your resolv.conf, .bashrc, anything in /usr/local, etc.

Get the SAN (subjectAltName) of a site's certificate.
Based on http://stackoverflow.com/questions/13127352/checking-alternative-names-for-a-san-ssl-cert Replace "facebook.com" with the desired hostname.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Retrieve "last modified" timestamp of web resource in UTC seconds
This command line assumes that "${url}" is the URL of the web resource. It can be useful to check the "freshness" of a download URL before a GET request.

split a string (3)

Update IP filter for qBittorrent
Downloads Bluetack's level 1 IP blocklist in .p2p format, suitable for various Bittorrent clients.

validate the syntax of a perl-compatible regular expression
Place the regular expression you want to validate between the forward slashes in the eval block.

Swap a file or dir with quick resotre
This lets you replace a file or directory and quickly revert if something goes wrong. For example, the current version of a website's files are in public_html. Put a new version of the site in public_html~ and execute the command. The names are swapped. If anything goes wrong, execute it again (up arrow or !!).

Print environment information.
Print environment (system) information using Perl.


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