Commands by adelyne (1)

  • Removes the useless "grep" step present in many other solutions and tries to be as short and as fast as possible. A more elegant solution but longer and spawning one more process would be: dpkg -l | awk '/^rc/ { print $2 }' | xargs dpkg -P Show Sample Output


    -1
    dpkg -P $(dpkg -l | awk '/^rc/ { print $2 }')
    adelyne · 2016-10-24 21:37:08 0

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