Commands tagged bash (750)

  • The above is just a prove of concept based around the nested bash substitution. This could be useful in situations where you're in a directory with many filetypes but you only want to convert a few. for f in *.bmp *.jpg *.tga; do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done or you can use ls | egrep to get more specific... but be warned, files with spaces will cause a ruckus with expansion but the bash for loop uses a space delimited list. for f in $(ls | egrep "bmp$|jpg$|tga$"); do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done I'm guessing some people will still prefer doing it the sed way but I thought the concept of this one was pretty neat. It will help me remember bash substitutions a little better :-P Show Sample Output


    7
    for f in t1.bmp t2.jpg t3.tga; do echo ${f%.*}.png; done
    zed · 2010-07-09 00:38:53 0
  • Define commands that you always invoke with an appended '&disown'. In the example: gvim foo.txt will open gvim dettached from the current terminal.


    0
    __disown(){ local cmd=$1 ; shift ; $cmd "$@" &> /dev/null &disown }; for i in gvim ; do alias $i="__disown $i"; done
    smolav · 2010-07-07 20:46:45 0
  • You can install filterous with sudo apt-get install libxslt1-dev; sudo easy_install -U filterous Show Sample Output


    2
    filterous -dntb --tag Bash < bookmarks.xml
    l0b0 · 2010-07-07 07:42:11 0
  • I rarely need this, but I have a hard time remembering the command when I need it. Admit it. This has happened to you. Yes this is bad, and you better clean up now. Borrowed from http://thoughtsbyclayg.blogspot.com/2008/02/how-to-delete-last-command-from-bash.html Show Sample Output


    0
    alias histdel='history -d $((HISTCMD-2)) && history -d $((HISTCMD-1))'
    StefanLasiewski · 2010-07-02 00:20:44 3
  • This function does a batch edition of all OOO3 Writer files in current directory. It uses sed to search a FOO pattern into body text of each file, then replace it to foo pattern (only the first match) . I did it because I've some hundreds of OOO3 Writer files where I did need to edit one word in each ones and open up each file in OOO3 gui wasn't an option. Usage: bsro3 FOO foo


    2
    bsro3 () { P=`pwd`; S=$1; R=$2; ls *.odt > /dev/null 2>&1; if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]; then exit 1; fi; for i in *.odt; do mkdir ${P}/T; cd ${P}/T; unzip -qq "$P"/"$i"; sed -i "s/$S/$R/" ${P}/T/content.xml; zip -qq -r "$P"/"$i" *; cd ${P}; rm -rf ${P}/T; done; }
    danpos · 2010-06-30 04:43:54 2
  • Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.


    45
    for code in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${code}m $code: Test"; done
    scribe · 2010-06-19 02:14:42 4
  • One of the first functions programmers learn is how to print a line. This is my 100% bash builtin function to do it, which makes it as optimal as a function can be. The COLUMNS environment variable is also set by bash (including bash resetting its value when you resize your term) so its very efficient. I like pretty-output in my shells and have experimented with several ways to output a line the width of the screen using a minimal amount of code. This is like version 9,000 lol. This function is what I use, though when using colors or other terminal features I create separate functions that call this one, since this is the lowest level type of function. It might be better named printl(), but since I use it so much it's more optimal to have the name contain less chars (both for my programming and for the internal workings). If you do use terminal escapes this will reset to default. tput sgr0 For implementation ideas, check my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    L(){ l=`builtin printf %${2:-$COLUMNS}s` && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-14 04:35:30 3
  • You can specify a range via '-'. Show Sample Output


    16
    !:1-3
    dbbolton · 2010-06-12 02:51:04 0
  • 'n' is a non-negative integer. Using 0 will expand to the name of the previous command. Show Sample Output


    8
    !:n
    dbbolton · 2010-06-12 02:48:27 0
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • I love this function because it tells me everything I want to know about files, more than stat, more than ls. It's very useful and infinitely expandable. find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' | sort -rgbS 50% 00761 drwxrw---x askapache:askapache 777:666 [06/10/10 | 06/10/10 | 06/10/10] [d] /web/cg/tmp The key is: # -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n' which believe it or not took me hundreds of tweaking before I was happy with the output. You can easily use this within a function to do whatever you want.. This simple function works recursively if you call it with -r as an argument, and sorts by file permissions. lsl(){ O="-maxdepth 1";sed -n '/-r/!Q1'<<<$@ &&O=;find $PWD $O -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -rgbS 50%; } Personally I'm using this function because: lll () { local a KS="1 -r -g"; sed -n '/-sort=/!Q1' <<< $@ && KS=`sed 's/.*-sort=\(.*\)/\1/g'<<<$@`; find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'|sort -k$KS -bS 50%; } # i can sort by user lll -sort=3 # or sort by group reversed lll -sort=4 -r # and sort by modification time lll -sort=6 If anyone wants to help me make this function handle multiple dirs/files like ls, go for it and I would appreciate it.. Something very minimal would be awesome.. maybe like: for a; do lll $a; done Note this uses the latest version of GNU find built from source, easy to build from gnu ftp tarball. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    7
    find $PWD -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G [%AD | %TD | %CD] [%Y] %p\n'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 22:03:08 4
  • Once you get into advanced/optimized scripts, functions, or cli usage, you will use the sort command alot. The options are difficult to master/memorize however, and when you use sort commands as much as I do (some examples below), it's useful to have the help available with a simple alias. I love this alias as I never seem to remember all the options for sort, and I use sort like crazy (much better than uniq for example). # Sorts by file permissions find . -maxdepth 1 -printf '%.5m %10M %p\n' | sort -k1 -r -g -bS 20% 00761 drwxrw---x ./tmp 00755 drwxr-xr-x . 00701 drwx-----x ./askapache-m 00644 -rw-r--r-- ./.htaccess # Shows uniq history fast history 1000 | sed 's/^[0-9 ]*//' | sort -fubdS 50% exec bash -lxv export TERM=putty-256color Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    alias sorth='sort --help|sed -n "/^ *-[^-]/s/^ *\(-[^ ]* -[^ ]*\) *\(.*\)/\1:\2/p"|column -ts":"'
    AskApache · 2010-06-10 21:30:31 0

  • 1
    acpi -V
    vajorie · 2010-06-09 14:23:08 0
  • Instead of having someone else read you the Digg headlines, Have OSX do it. Requires Curl+Sed+Say. This could probably be easily modified to use espeak for Linux.


    -2
    IFS=`echo -en "\n\b"`; for i in $(curl http://feeds.digg.com/digg/container/technology/popular.rss | grep '<title>' | sed -e 's#<[^>]*>##g' | tail -n10); do echo $i; echo $i | sed 's/^/Did you hear about /g' | say; sleep 30; done
    echosedawk · 2010-06-07 22:16:19 1
  • Get colorful fortunes dictated by an ASCII cow. For full enjoyment you'll need to have color setup enabled for your terminal.


    -6
    cowsay `fortune` | toilet --metal -f term
    seattlegaucho · 2010-06-03 21:48:54 1

  • 5
    declare -F | cut -d ' ' -f 3
    wilmoore · 2010-05-29 08:19:47 0
  • Same as original, but works in bash


    2
    while [ 1 -lt 2 ]; do i=0; COL=$((RANDOM%$(tput cols)));ROW=$((RANDOM%$(tput cols)));while [ $i -lt $COL ]; do tput cup $i $ROW;echo -e "\033[1;34m" $(cat /dev/urandom | head -1 | cut -c1-1) 2>/dev/null ; i=$(expr $i + 1); done; done
    dave1010 · 2010-05-28 16:07:56 1
  • If you have a directory with many working copies of various subversion projects and you want to update them all at once, this one may be for you. Show Sample Output


    -2
    for d in $(find . -maxdepth 1 -type d -name '[^.]*'); do cd "$d"; svn up; cd ..; done
    udog · 2010-05-28 10:09:19 0

  • -15
    fbemailscraper YourFBEmail Password
    coast · 2010-05-26 20:52:29 1
  • The first grep any line with pod-feed in it plus the following five lines. The second grep throws out any line not containing . sed removes the leading four spaces then and the trailing . Using a colon as sed's separating character avoids having to escape the /. Works ok with Mythbuntu 9.04 (used mostly as a three line bash script). Show Sample Output


    1
    grep -A 5 -e podcast-feed rhythmdb.xml | grep -e "<location>" | sed 's: *</*[a-t]*>::g' > PodFeeds.txt
    dogflap · 2010-05-22 05:50:45 2
  • This provides a way to sort output based on the length of the line, so that shorter lines appear before longer lines. It's an addon to the sort that I've wanted for years, sometimes it's very useful. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    sortwc () { local L;while read -r L;do builtin printf "${#L}@%s\n" "$L";done|sort -n|sed -u 's/^[^@]*@//'; }
    AskApache · 2010-05-20 20:13:52 1
  • I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead. If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; } Show Sample Output


    2
    command ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -vsz -A|sed -u '/^ *PID/d;10q'
    AskApache · 2010-05-18 18:41:38 1
  • Gives you a list for all installed chrome (chromium) extensions with URL to the page of the extension. With this you can easy add a new Bookmark folder called "extensions" add every URL to that folder, so it will be synced and you can access the names from every computer you are logged in. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Only tested with chromium, for chrome you maybe have to change the find $PATH. Show Sample Output


    2
    for i in $(find ~/.config/chromium/*/Extensions -name 'manifest.json'); do n=$(grep -hIr name $i| cut -f4 -d '"'| sort);u="https://chrome.google.com/extensions/detail/";ue=$(basename $(dirname $(dirname $i))); echo -e "$n:\n$u$ue\n" ; done
    new_user · 2010-05-18 15:16:36 1
  • /usr/sbin/ab2 -f TLS1 -S -n 1000 -c 100 -t 2 http://www.google.com/ then !:- http://www.commandlinefu.com/ is the same as /usr/sbin/ab2 -f TLS1 -S -n 1000 -c 100 -t 2 http://www.commandlinefu.com/


    71
    !:-
    new_user · 2010-05-15 15:12:47 1

  • 4
    tail -n2000 /var/www/domains/*/*/logs/access_log | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n | awk '{ if ($1 > 20)print $1,$2}'
    allrightname · 2010-05-10 19:08:37 0
  • ‹ First  < 18 19 20 21 22 >  Last ›

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: