Commands using read (314)

  • This will save your open windows to a file (~/.windows). To start those applications: cat ~/.windows | while read line; do $line &; done Should work on any EWMH/NetWM compatible X Window Manager. If you use DWM or another Window Manager not using EWMH or NetWM try this: xwininfo -root -children | grep '^ ' | grep -v children | grep -v '<unknown>' | sed -n 's/^ *\(0x[0-9a-f]*\) .*/\1/p' | uniq | while read line; do xprop -id $line _NET_WM_PID | sed -n 's/.* = \([0-9]*\)$/\1/p'; done | uniq -u | grep -v '^$' | while read line; do ps -o cmd= $line; done > ~/.windows Show Sample Output


    5
    wmctrl -l -p | while read line; do ps -o cmd= "$(echo "$line" | awk '$0=$3')"; done > ~/.windows
    matthewbauer · 2010-07-04 22:11:24 2
  • Revised approach to and3k's version, using pipes and read rather than command substitution. This does not require fiddling with IFS when paths have whitespace, and does not risk hitting command-line size limits. It's less verbose on the missing files, but it stops iterating at the first file that's missing, so it should be definitely faster. I expanded all the qlist options to be more self-describing.


    3
    emerge -av1 `qlist --installed --nocolor | uniq | while read cp; do qlist --exact $cp | while read file; do test -e $file || { echo $cp; echo "$cp: missing $file (and maybe more)" 1>&2; break; }; done; done`
    Flameeyes · 2010-07-04 19:55:42 2
  • This shows every bit of information that stat can get for any file, dir, fifo, etc. It's great because it also shows the format and explains it for each format option. If you just want stat help, create this handy alias 'stath' to display all format options with explanations. alias stath="stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'" To display on 2 lines: ( F=/etc/screenrc N=c IFS=$'\n'; for L in $(sed 's/%Z./%Z\n/'<<<`stat --h|sed -n '/^ *%/s/^ *%\(.\).*$/\1:%\1/p'`); do G=$(echo "stat -$N '$L' \"$F\""); eval $G; N=fc;done; ) For a similarly powerful stat-like function optimized for pretty output (and can sort by any field), check out the "lll" function http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5815/advanced-ls-output-using-find-for-formattedsortable-file-stat-info From my .bash_profile -> http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    3
    statt(){ C=c;stat --h|sed '/Th/,/NO/!d;/%/!d'|while read l;do p=${l/% */};[ $p == %Z ]&&C=fc&&echo ^FS:^;echo "`stat -$C $p \"$1\"` ^$p^${l#%* }";done|column -ts^; }
    AskApache · 2010-06-11 23:31:03 0
  • This provides a way to sort output based on the length of the line, so that shorter lines appear before longer lines. It's an addon to the sort that I've wanted for years, sometimes it's very useful. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    sortwc () { local L;while read -r L;do builtin printf "${#L}@%s\n" "$L";done|sort -n|sed -u 's/^[^@]*@//'; }
    AskApache · 2010-05-20 20:13:52 1
  • Plays the mp3 stream of The Current as a background job. When you are done run: fg %1 then to exit Quite possible with Growl for mac I'd guess, although have not tried. Libnotify needed for notification, stream will still work otherwise


    7
    mplayer http://minnesota.publicradio.org/tools/play/streams/the_current.pls < /dev/null | grep --line-buffered "StreamTitle='.*S" -o | grep --line-buffered "'.*'" -o > mus & tail -n0 -f mus | while read line; do notify-send "Music Change" "$line";done
    spiffwalker · 2010-05-09 17:51:40 0
  • Some servers don't have ssh-copy-id, this works in those cases. It will ask for the destination server, this can be IP, hostname, or user@hostname if different from current user. Ssh keygen will let you know if a pubkey already exists on your system and you can opt to not overwrite it.


    -2
    echo 'Host or User@Host?:'; read newserver && ssh-keygen -N "" -t rsa -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa ; ssh $newserver cat <~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub ">>" ~/.ssh/authorized_keys ; ssh $newserver
    alf · 2010-05-07 06:24:53 1
  • in "a.html", find all images referred as relative URI in an HTML file by "src" attribute of "img" element, replace them with "data:" URI. This useful to create single HTML file holding all images in it, as a replacement of the IE-created .mht file format. The generated HTML works fine on every other browser except IE, as well as many HTML editors like kompozer, while the .mht format only works for IE, but not for every other browser. Compare to the KDE's own single-file-web-page format "war" format, which only opens correctly on KDE, the HTML file with "data:" URI is more universally supported. The above command have many bugs. My commandline-fu is too limited to fix them: 1. it assume all URLs are relative URIs, thus works in this case: <img src="images/logo.png"/> but does not work in this case: <img src="http://www.my_web_site.com/images/logo.png" /> This may not be a bug, as full URIs perhaps should be ignored in many use cases. 2. it only work for images whoes file name suffix is one of .jpg, .gif, .png, albeit images with .jpeg suffix and those without extension names at all are legal to HTML. 3. image file name is not allowed to contain "(" even though frequently used, as in "(copy of) my car.jpg". Besides, neither single nor double quotes are allowed. 4. There is infact a big flaw in this, file names are actually used as regular expression to be replaced with base64 encoded content. This cause the script to fail in many other cases. Example: 'D:\images\logo.png', where backward slash have different meaning in regular expression. I don't know how to fix this. I don't know any command that can do full text (no regular expression) replacement the way basic editors like gedit does. 5. The original a.html are not preserved, so a user should make a copy first in case things go wrong.


    4
    grep -ioE "(url\(|src=)['\"]?[^)'\"]*" a.html | grep -ioE "[^\"'(]*.(jpg|png|gif)" | while read l ; do sed -i "s>$l>data:image/${l/[^.]*./};base64,`openssl enc -base64 -in $l| tr -d '\n'`>" a.html ; done;
    zhangweiwu · 2010-05-05 14:07:51 2

  • 6
    cat list|while read lines;do echo "USER admin">ftp;echo "PASS $lines">>ftp;echo "QUIT">>ftp;nc 192.168.77.128 21 <ftp>ftp2;echo "trying: $lines";cat ftp2|grep "230">/dev/null;[ "$?" -eq "0" ]&& echo "pass: $lines" && break;done
    FuRt3X · 2010-05-02 07:37:22 2
  • Create a text file called domainlist.txt with a domain per line, then run the command above. All registries are a little different, so play around with the command. Should produce a list of domains and their expirations date. I am responsible for my companies domains and have a dozen or so myself, so this is a quick check if I overlooked any.


    3
    cat domainlist.txt | while read line; do echo -ne $line; whois $line | grep Expiration ; done | sed 's:Expiration Date::'
    netsaint · 2010-05-02 06:49:09 1

  • 2
    find ~ -maxdepth 2 -name .git -print | while read repo; do cd $(dirname $repo); git pull; done
    l0b0 · 2010-04-27 08:51:52 0
  • If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10 # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz . I personally find myself having to reference date --help quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner. Here's the old version: alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t' This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ] Show Sample Output


    21
    alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 01:22:18 5
  • SH

    cat mod_log_config.c | shmore or shmore < mod_log_config.c Most pagers like less, more, most, and others require additional processes to be loaded, additional cpu time used, and if that wasn't bad enough, most of them modify the output in ways that can be undesirable. What I wanted was a "more" pager that was basically the same as running: cat file Without modifying the output and without additional processes being created, cpu used, etc. Normally if you want to scroll the output of cat file without modifying the output I would have to scroll back my terminal or screen buffer because less modifies the output. After looking over many examples ranging from builtin cat functions created for csh, zsh, ksh, sh, and bash from the 80's, 90s, and more recent examples shipped with bash 4, and after much trial and error, I finally came up with something that satisifed my objective. It automatically adjusts to the size of your terminal window by using the LINES variable (or 80 lines if that is empty) so This is a great function that will work as long as your shell works, so it will work just find if you are booted in single user mode and your /usr/bin directory is missing (where less and other pagers can be). Using builtins like this is fantastic and is comparable to how busybox works, as long as your shell works this will work. One caveat/note: I always have access to a color terminal, and I always setup both the termcap and the terminfo packages for color terminals (and/or ncurses and slang), so for that reason I stuck the tput setab 4; tput setaf 7 command at the beginning of the function, so it only runs 1 time, and that causes the -- SHMore -- prompt to have a blue background and bright white text. This is one of hundreds of functions I have in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html">.bash_profile at http://www.askapache.com/">AskApache.com, but actually won't be included till the next update. If you can improve this in any way at all please let me know, I would be very grateful! ( Like one thing I want is to be able to continue to the next screen by pressing any key instead of now having to press enter to continue) Show Sample Output


    6
    shmore(){ local l L M="`echo;tput setab 4&&tput setaf 7` --- SHMore --- `tput sgr0`";L=2;while read l;do echo "${l}";((L++));[[ "$L" == "${LINES:-80}" ]]&&{ L=2;read -p"$M" -u1;echo;};done;}
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 00:40:37 1
  • Taking file with ip ranges, each on it's own line like: cat ipranges.txt 213.87.86.160-213.87.86.193 213.87.87.0-213.87.88.255 91.135.210.0-91.135.210.255 command returns deaggregated ip ranges using ipcalc deaggregate feature like that: 213.87.86.160/27 213.87.86.192/31 213.87.87.0/24 213.87.88.0/24 91.135.210.0/24 Useful for configuring nginx geo module Show Sample Output


    7
    /bin/grep - ipranges.txt | while read line; do ipcalc $line ; done | grep -v deag
    tf8 · 2010-04-20 21:13:00 0

  • -16
    ls | grep *.txt | while read file; do cat $file >> ./output.txt; done;
    octopus · 2010-04-16 13:19:38 1
  • Just added -sn1 -s = silent -n1 = only one symbol needed to continue after the insert Show Sample Output


    6
    read -sn1 -p "Press any key to continue..."; echo
    vibaf · 2010-04-13 20:37:26 0
  • Waiting for a key stroke. You can use this with a ";" behind to build a command chain. Show Sample Output


    4
    read -p "Press enter to continue.."
    brubaker · 2010-04-13 13:05:09 0

  • 8
    du -cks * | sort -rn | while read size fname; do for unit in k M G T P E Z Y; do if [ $size -lt 1024 ]; then echo -e "${size}${unit}\t${fname}"; break; fi; size=$((size/1024)); done; done
    askedrelic · 2010-04-05 17:09:14 0
  • extension to tali713's random fact generator. It takes the output & sends it to notify-osd. Display time is proportional to the lengh of the fact.


    2
    wget randomfunfacts.com -O - 2>/dev/null | grep \<strong\> | sed "s;^.*<i>\(.*\)</i>.*$;\1;" | while read FUNFACT; do notify-send -t $((1000+300*`echo -n $FUNFACT | wc -w`)) -i gtk-dialog-info "RandomFunFact" "$FUNFACT"; done
    mtron · 2010-04-02 09:43:32 1
  • hold period (or whatever character) and hit enter after a second. You need to make the next line of periods the same length as the previous line... score starts at 0 and increase each time length of line is same.


    1
    while $8;do read n;[ $n = "$l" ]&&c=$(($c+1))||c=0;echo $c;l=$n;done
    florian · 2010-03-31 00:41:08 0
  • Really bored during class so I made this... Basically, you hold period (or whatever) and hit enter after a second and you need to make the next line of periods the same length as the previous line... My record was 5 lines of the same length. It's best if you do it one handed with your pointer on period and ring on enter.


    8
    count="1" ; while true ; do read next ; if [[ "$next" = "$last" ]] ; then count=$(($count+1)) ; echo "$count" ; else count="1" ; echo $count ; fi ; last="$next" ; done
    dabom · 2010-03-30 04:02:29 11
  • Compresses each file individually, creating a $fileneame.tar.gz and removes the uncompressed version, usefull if you have lots of files and don't want 1 huge archive containing them all. you could replace ls with ls *.pdf to just perform the action on pdfs for example.


    -2
    ls | while read filename; do tar -czvf "$filename".tar.gz "$filename"; rm "$filename"; done
    Thingymebob · 2010-03-29 08:10:38 2
  • If you want to relocate a package on your own, or you just want to know what those PREIN/UN and POSTIN/UN scripts will do, this will dump out all that detail simply. You may want to expand the egrep out other verbose flags like CHANGELOGTEXT etc, as your needs require. It isn't clear, but the formatting around $tag is important: %{$tag} just prints out the first line, while [%{$tag }] iterates thru multi-line output, joining the lines with a space (yes, there's a space between the g and } characters. To break it out for all newlines, use [%{$tag\n}] but the output will be long. This is aside from rpm2cpio | cpio -ivd to extract the package files.


    0
    rpm --querytags | egrep -v HEADERIMMUTABLE | sort | while read tag ; do rpm -q --queryformat "$tag: [%{$tag} ]\n" -p $SomeRPMfile ; done
    DoNotRememberMe · 2010-03-25 05:40:48 0
  • When your wtmp files are being logrotated, here's an easy way to unpack them all on the fly to see more than a week in the past. The rm is the primitive way to prevent symlink prediction attack.


    5
    ( last ; ls -t /var/log/wtmp-2* | while read line ; do ( rm /tmp/wtmp-junk ; zcat $line 2>/dev/null || bzcat $line ) > /tmp/junk-wtmp ; last -f /tmp/junk-wtmp ; done ) | less
    DoNotRememberMe · 2010-03-16 04:17:16 0
  • This is not recommended... lossy -> lossy = lossier. Still, you can do it! ;)


    0
    find . -iname '*.mp3' | while read song; do mpg321 ${song} -w - | oggenc -q 9 -o ${song%.mp3}.ogg -; done
    renich · 2010-03-14 11:34:35 0
  • Read all contents from current directory and display to stdout.


    -6
    while read f;do echo "$f";done < <(find .)
    unixmonkey8504 · 2010-03-02 14:22:22 0
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