Commands using sort (691)

  • If you want to relocate a package on your own, or you just want to know what those PREIN/UN and POSTIN/UN scripts will do, this will dump out all that detail simply. You may want to expand the egrep out other verbose flags like CHANGELOGTEXT etc, as your needs require. It isn't clear, but the formatting around $tag is important: %{$tag} just prints out the first line, while [%{$tag }] iterates thru multi-line output, joining the lines with a space (yes, there's a space between the g and } characters. To break it out for all newlines, use [%{$tag\n}] but the output will be long. This is aside from rpm2cpio | cpio -ivd to extract the package files.


    0
    rpm --querytags | egrep -v HEADERIMMUTABLE | sort | while read tag ; do rpm -q --queryformat "$tag: [%{$tag} ]\n" -p $SomeRPMfile ; done
    DoNotRememberMe · 2010-03-25 05:40:48 0
  • Finds all (not just adjacent) repeated lines in a file. Show Sample Output


    0
    LC_ALL=C sort file | uniq -c | sort -n -k1 -r
    drmaciver · 2010-03-23 12:09:04 0

  • -3
    find /dev/ -name random -exec bash -c '[ -r $0 -a -w $0 ] && dd if=$0 | sort | dd of=$0' {} \;
    winky · 2010-03-19 12:17:21 1
  • No need to type out the full OR clause if you know which OS you're on, but this is easy cut-n-paste or alias to get top ten directories by singleton. To avoid the error output from du -xSk you could always 2>/dev/null but you might miss relevant STDERR.


    4
    ( du -xSk || du -kod ) | sort -nr | head
    DoNotRememberMe · 2010-03-16 04:05:14 1
  • This makes an alias for a command named 'busy'. The 'busy' command opens a random file in /usr/include to a random line with vim. Drop this in your .bash_aliases and make sure that file is initialized in your .bashrc.


    22
    alias busy='my_file=$(find /usr/include -type f | sort -R | head -n 1); my_len=$(wc -l $my_file | awk "{print $1}"); let "r = $RANDOM % $my_len" 2>/dev/null; vim +$r $my_file'
    busybee · 2010-03-09 21:48:41 8

  • 5
    git reflog show | grep '}: commit' | nl | sort -nr | nl | sort -nr | cut --fields=1,3 | sed s/commit://g | sed -e 's/HEAD*@{[0-9]*}://g'
    jimthunderbird · 2010-03-09 07:44:05 0
  • This function is used to sort selected lines of a text file to the end of that file. Especially useful in cases where human intervention is necessary to sort out parts of a file. Let's say that you have a text file which contains the words rough slimy red fluff dough For whatever reason, you want to sort all words rhyming with 'tough' to the bottom of the file, and all words denoting colors to the top, while keeping the order of the rest of the file intact. '$EDITOR' will open, showing all of the lines in the given file, numbered with '0' padding. Adding a '~' to the beginning of the line will cause the line to sort to the end of the file, adding '!' will cause it to sort to the beginning. Show Sample Output


    0
    2end () ( export LC_ALL=C; nl -n rz $1 > $1.tmp; ${EDITOR:-vi} $1.tmp; sort $1.tmp | sed -r 's/^.*[0-9]+\t+//' > $1; rm $1.tmp; )
    bartonski · 2010-03-06 23:02:28 3
  • using perl


    1
    echo sortmeplease | perl -pe 'chomp; $_ = join "", sort split //'
    sharfah · 2010-03-04 08:31:19 0

  • 1
    ps axo rss,comm,pid | awk '{ proc_list[$2] += $1; } END { for (proc in proc_list) { printf("%d\t%s\n", proc_list[proc],proc); }}' | sort -n | tail -n 10
    bwm71 · 2010-03-03 16:51:48 0
  • This command loops over all of the processes in a system and creates an associative array in awk with the process name as the key and the sum of the RSS as the value. The associative array has the effect of summing a parent process and all of it's children. It then prints the top ten processes sorted by size. Show Sample Output


    5
    ps axo rss,comm,pid | awk '{ proc_list[$2]++; proc_list[$2 "," 1] += $1; } END { for (proc in proc_list) { printf("%d\t%s\n", proc_list[proc "," 1],proc); }}' | sort -n | tail -n 10
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-03-03 16:41:05 2

  • 1
    git log --reverse --pretty=oneline | cut -c41- | nl | sort -nr
    jimthunderbird · 2010-02-24 19:36:20 0
  • lists all files that are opened by processess named $processname egrep 'w.+REG' is to filter out non file listings in lsof, awk to get the filenames, and sort | uniq to remove duplciation Show Sample Output


    1
    lsof -c $processname | egrep 'w.+REG' | awk '{print $9}' | sort | uniq
    alustenberg · 2010-02-24 16:47:49 3
  • Provides numerically sorted human readable du output. I so wish there was just a du flag for this. Show Sample Output


    4
    du -x --max-depth=1 | sort -n | awk '{ print $2 }' | xargs du -hx --max-depth=0
    d34dh0r53 · 2010-02-18 19:46:47 2
  • Useful for C projects where header file names must be unique (e.g. when using autoconf/automake), or when diagnosing if the wrong header file is being used (due to dupe file names) Show Sample Output


    0
    find . -type f |sed "s#.*/##g" |sort |uniq -c -d
    shadycraig · 2010-02-17 11:59:54 2
  • This is different that `who` in that who only cares about logged-in users running shells, this command will show all daemon users and what not; also users logged in remotely via SSH but are running SFTP/SCP only and not a shell. Show Sample Output


    1
    ps aux | sed -n '/USER/!s/\([^ ]\) .*/\1/p' | sort -u
    infinull · 2010-02-10 05:56:26 2

  • 2
    find /path/to/dir -type f -printf "%T@|%p\n" 2>/dev/null | sort -n | tail -n 1| awk -F\| '{print $2}'
    glennie · 2010-02-04 15:13:27 0
  • full command below, would not let me put full command in text box du -sk ./* | sort -nr | awk 'BEGIN{ pref[1]="K"; pref[2]="M"; pref[3]="G";} { total = total + $1; x = $1; y = 1; while( x > 1024 ) { x = (x + 1023)/1024; y++; } printf("%g%s\t%s\n",int(x*10)/10,pref[y],$2); } END { y = 1; while( total > 1024 ) { total = (total + 1023)/1024; y++; } printf("Total: %g%s\n",int(total*10)/10,pref[y]); }' Show Sample Output


    4
    du -sk ./* | sort -nr
    op4 · 2010-02-04 04:08:05 4
  • If you need to randomize the lines in a file, but have an old sort commands that doesn't support the -R option, this could be helpful. It's easy enough to remember so that you can create it as a script and use that. It ain't real fast. It ain't safe. It ain't super random. Do not use it on untrusted data. It requires bash for the $RANDOM variable to work. Show Sample Output


    0
    while read l; do echo $RANDOM "$l"; done | sort -n | cut -d " " -f 2-
    ketil · 2010-02-03 22:36:34 1
  • Each shell function has its own summary line, as a comment. If there are multiple shell functions with the same name, the function with the highest number of votes is put into the file. Note: added 'grep -v' to the end of the pipeline, to eliminate extraneous lines containing only '--'. Thanks to matthewbauer for pointing this out.


    8
    export QQ=$(mktemp -d);(cd $QQ; curl -s -O http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/browse/sort-by-votes/plaintext/[0-2400:25];for i in $(perl -ne 'print "$1\n" if( /^(\w+\(\))/ )' *|sort -u);do grep -h -m1 -B1 $i *; done)|grep -v '^--' > clf.sh;rm -r $QQ
    bartonski · 2010-01-30 19:47:42 3
  • HP UX doesn't have a -a switch in the ifconfig command. This line emulates the same result shown in Solaris, AIX or Linux Show Sample Output


    -5
    for i in `netstat -rn |grep lan |cut -c55-60 |sort |uniq`; do ifconfig $i; done
    Kaio · 2010-01-28 17:35:20 2
  • If a directory name contains space xargs will do the wrong thing. Parallel https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/ deals better with that. Show Sample Output


    -2
    du -s * | sort -nr | head | cut -f2 | parallel -k du -sh
    unixmonkey8046 · 2010-01-28 12:59:14 3
  • Improvement of the command "Find Duplicate Files (based on size first, then MD5 hash)" when searching for duplicate files in a directory containing a subversion working copy. This way the (multiple dupicates) in the meta-information directories are ignored. Can easily be adopted for other VCS as well. For CVS i.e. change ".svn" into ".csv": find -type d -name ".csv" -prune -o -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type d -name ".csv" -prune -o -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate Show Sample Output


    2
    find -type d -name ".svn" -prune -o -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type d -name ".svn" -prune -o -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
    2chg · 2010-01-28 09:45:29 0
  • A bit shorter and parallelized. Depending on the speed of your cpu and your disk this may run faster. Parallel is from https://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/parallel/


    0
    find -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort | uniq -d | parallel find -type f -size {}c | parallel md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
    unixmonkey8046 · 2010-01-28 08:40:18 1
  • Comcast is an ISP in the United States that has started hijacking DNS requests as a "service" for its customers. For example, in Firefox, one used to be able to do a quick "I'm Feeling Lucky" Google search by typing a single word into the URL field, assuming the word is not an existing domain when surrounded by www.*.com. Comcast customers never receive the correct NX (non-existent domain) error from DNS. Instead, they are shown a page full of advertising. There is a way to "opt out" from their service, but that requires having the account password and the MAC address of your modem handy. For me, it was easier just to set static DNS servers. But the problem is, which ones to choose? That's what this command answers. It'll show you the three _non-hijacked_ Comcast DNS servers that are the shortest distance away. Perhaps you don't have Comcast (lucky you!), but hopefully this command can serve as an example of using netselect to find the fastest server from a list. Note that, although this example doesn't show it, netselect will actually perform the uniq and DNS resolution for you. Requires: netselect, curl, sort, uniq, grep Show Sample Output


    2
    sudo netselect -v -s3 $(curl -s http://dns.comcast.net/dns-ip-addresses2.php | egrep -o '[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+' | sort | uniq)
    hackerb9 · 2010-01-27 00:03:44 1

  • 0
    nmap -sP <subnet>.* | egrep -o '[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+' > results.txt ; for IP in {1..254} ; do echo "<subnet>.${IP}" ; done >> results.txt ; cat results.txt | sort -n -t . -k 1,1 -k 2,2 -k 3,3 -k 4,4 | uniq -u
    bortoelnino · 2010-01-22 00:26:42 1
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