Commands tagged sort (175)


  • 2
    grep current_state= /var/log/nagios/status.dat|sort|uniq -c|sed -e "s/[\t ]*\([0-9]*\).*current_state=\([0-9]*\)/\2:\1/"|tr "\n" " "
    c3w · 2010-03-11 06:04:14 0
  • Gives you a list for all installed chrome (chromium) extensions with URL to the page of the extension. With this you can easy add a new Bookmark folder called "extensions" add every URL to that folder, so it will be synced and you can access the names from every computer you are logged in. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Only tested with chromium, for chrome you maybe have to change the find $PATH. Show Sample Output


    2
    for i in $(find ~/.config/chromium/*/Extensions -name 'manifest.json'); do n=$(grep -hIr name $i| cut -f4 -d '"'| sort);u="https://chrome.google.com/extensions/detail/";ue=$(basename $(dirname $(dirname $i))); echo -e "$n:\n$u$ue\n" ; done
    new_user · 2010-05-18 15:16:36 1
  • I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead. If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; } Show Sample Output


    2
    command ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -vsz -A|sed -u '/^ *PID/d;10q'
    AskApache · 2010-05-18 18:41:38 1
  • This provides a way to sort output based on the length of the line, so that shorter lines appear before longer lines. It's an addon to the sort that I've wanted for years, sometimes it's very useful. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    sortwc () { local L;while read -r L;do builtin printf "${#L}@%s\n" "$L";done|sort -n|sed -u 's/^[^@]*@//'; }
    AskApache · 2010-05-20 20:13:52 1
  • Works with files containing spaces and for very large directories.


    2
    find -type f -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort
    dooblem · 2010-05-29 13:40:18 0
  • Shows a list of users that currently running processes are executing as. YMMV regarding ps and it's many variants. For example, you might need: ps -axgu | cut -f1 -d' ' | sort -u Show Sample Output


    2
    ps -eo user | sort -u
    dfaulkner · 2010-07-07 12:28:44 0
  • This uses some tricks I found while reading the bash man page to enumerate and display all the current environment variables, including those not listed by the 'env' command which according to the bash docs are more for internal use by BASH. The main trick is the way bash will list all environment variable names when performing expansion on ${!A*}. Then the eval builtin makes it work in a loop. I created a function for this and use it instead of env. (by aliasing env). This is the function that given any parameters lists the variables that start with it. So 'aae B' would list all env variables starting wit B. And 'aae {A..Z} {a..z}' would list all variables starting with any letter of the alphabet. And 'aae TERM' would list all variables starting with TERM. aae(){ local __a __i __z;for __a in "[email protected]";do __z=\${!${__a}*};for __i in `eval echo "${__z}"`;do echo -e "$__i: ${!__i}";done;done; } And my printenv replacement is: alias env='aae {A..Z} {a..z} "_"|sort|cat -v 2>&1 | sed "s/\\^\\[/\\\\033/g"' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html Show Sample Output


    2
    for _a in {A..Z} {a..z};do _z=\${!${_a}*};for _i in `eval echo "${_z}"`;do echo -e "$_i: ${!_i}";done;done|cat -Tsv
    AskApache · 2010-10-27 07:16:54 0

  • 2
    awk '{if ($1 ~ /Package/) p = $2; if ($1 ~ /Installed/) printf("%9d %s\n", $2, p)}' /var/lib/dpkg/status | sort -n | tail
    gb38 · 2010-12-14 14:59:42 0
  • list top committers (and number of their commits) of svn repository. in this example it counts revisions of current directory. Show Sample Output


    2
    svn log -q | grep '^r[0-9]' | cut -f2 -d "|" | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
    kkapron · 2011-01-03 15:23:08 0
  • This works by reading in two lines of input, turning each into a list of one-character matches that are sorted and compared.


    2
    (echo foobar; echo farboo) | perl -E 'say[sort<>=~/./g]~~[sort<>=~/./g]?"anagram":"not anagram"'
    doherty · 2011-02-17 02:15:46 0
  • Show disk space info, grepping out the uninteresting ones beginning with ^none while we're at it. The main point of this submission is the way it maintains the header row with the command grouping, by removing it from the pipeline before it gets fed into the sort command. (I'm surprised sort doesn't have an option to skip a header row, actually..) It took me a while to work out how to do this, I thought of it as I was drifting off to sleep last night! Show Sample Output


    2
    df -h | grep -v ^none | ( read header ; echo "$header" ; sort -rn -k 5)
    purpleturtle · 2011-03-16 14:25:45 1
  • List all MAC addresses on a Linux box. sort -u is useful when having virtual interfaces.


    2
    sort -u < /sys/class/net/*/address
    marssi · 2011-05-18 17:50:44 0
  • Randomizes a file. The opposite of sort is sort -R!


    2
    sort -R
    RyanM · 2011-07-15 15:35:27 0
  • Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great. Show Sample Output


    2
    lsr() { find "${@:-.}" -print0 |sort -z |xargs -0 ls $LS_OPTIONS -dla; }
    h3xx · 2011-08-15 03:10:58 0
  • (separator = $IFS)


    2
    ps aux | sort -nk 6
    totti · 2011-08-16 11:04:45 0
  • sort command can sort month-wise (first three letters of each month). See the sample output for clarification. Sorting Stable ? NO. Take note if that matters to you. Sample output suggests that sort performs unstable sorting (see the relative order of two 'feb' entries). Show Sample Output


    2
    sort -M filename
    b_t · 2011-12-10 12:50:30 0

  • 2
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head
    mesuutt · 2012-06-29 12:43:06 3

  • 2
    du --max-depth=1 -h * |sort -n -k 1 |egrep 'M|G'
    leonteale · 2013-02-07 18:52:29 0
  • Get the longest match of file extension (Ex. For 'foo.tar.gz', you get '.tar.gz' instead of '.gz') Show Sample Output


    2
    find /some/path -type f -printf '%f\n' | grep -o '\..\+$' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn
    skkzsh · 2013-03-18 14:42:29 1
  • Displays the duplicated lines in a file and their occuring frequency.


    1
    cat file.txt | sort | uniq -dc
    Vadi · 2009-03-21 18:15:14 3
  • A little bit smaller, faster and should handle files with special characters in the name.


    1
    find . -maxdepth 1 ! -name '.' -execdir du -0 -s {} + | sort -znr | gawk 'BEGIN{ORS=RS="\0";} {sub($1 "\t", ""); print $0;}' | xargs -0 du -hs
    ashawley · 2009-09-11 16:07:39 2
  • Counts TCP states from Netstat and displays in an ordered list. Show Sample Output


    1
    netstat -an | awk '/tcp/ {print $6}' | sort | uniq -c
    Kered557 · 2010-05-06 17:04:37 1
  • use Linux ;) Show Sample Output


    1
    pgrep -cu ioggstream
    ioggstream · 2010-05-21 10:53:57 0
  • Just a little simplification.


    1
    find /path/to/dir -type f | grep -o '\.[^./]*$' | sort | uniq
    dooblem · 2010-08-12 14:32:48 1
  • If your grep doesn't have an -o option, you can use sed instead.


    1
    find /path/to/dir -type f -name '*.*' | sed '[email protected]*/.*\[email protected]@' | sort | uniq
    putnamhill · 2010-08-12 15:48:54 0
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