Commands tagged Linux (264)

  • In the above example 'muspi merol' (the output of the first rev command) is sent to stderr and 'lorem ipsum' (the output of the second rev command) is sent to stdout. rev reverse lines of a file or files. This use of tee allows testing if a program correctly handles its input without using files that hold the data. Show Sample Output


    2
    rev <<< 'lorem ipsum' | tee /dev/stderr | rev
    penpen · 2009-03-31 13:12:09 2
  • There was another line that was dependent on having un-named screen sessions. This just wouldn't do. This one works no matter what the name is. A possible improvement would be removing the perl dependence, but that doesn't effect me.


    2
    for i in `screen -ls | perl -ne'if(/^\s+\d+\.([^\s]+)/){print $1, " "}'`; do gnome-terminal -e "screen -x $i"; done
    hank · 2009-04-25 22:39:24 1
  • Shell timeout variables (TMOUT) can be very liberal about what is classified as 'activity', like having an editor open. This command string will terminate the login shell for an user with more than a day's idle time.


    2
    fuser -k `who -u | awk '$6 == "old" { print "/dev/"$2'}`
    lbonanomi · 2009-09-07 03:36:43 2
  • This command gives you the charset of a text file, which would be handy if you have no idea of the encoding. Show Sample Output


    2
    file -i <textfile>
    juvenn · 2009-09-08 01:33:19 1
  • This command will transcode a MythTV recording. The target device is a Google Nexus One mobile phone. My recordings are from a HDHomerun with Over The Air content. Plays back nicely on the N1.


    2
    ffmpeg -i /var/lib/mythtv/pretty/Chuck20100208800PMChuckVersustheMask.mpg -s 800x480 -vcodec mpeg4 -acodec libfaac -ac 2 -ar 16000 -r 13 -ab 32000 -aspect 16:9 Chuck20100208800PMChuckVersustheMask.mp4
    PLA · 2010-02-12 12:11:02 0
  • extension to tali713's random fact generator. It takes the output & sends it to notify-osd. Display time is proportional to the lengh of the fact.


    2
    wget randomfunfacts.com -O - 2>/dev/null | grep \<strong\> | sed "s;^.*<i>\(.*\)</i>.*$;\1;" | while read FUNFACT; do notify-send -t $((1000+300*`echo -n $FUNFACT | wc -w`)) -i gtk-dialog-info "RandomFunFact" "$FUNFACT"; done
    mtron · 2010-04-02 09:43:32 1
  • A little aptitude magic. Note: this will remove images AND headers. If you just want to remove images: aptitude remove ?and(~i~nlinux-im ?not(~n`uname -r`)) I used this in zsh without any problems. I'm not sure how other shells will interpret some of the special characters used in the aptitude search terms. Use -s to simulate.


    2
    aptitude remove ?and(~i~nlinux-(im|he) ?not(~n`uname -r`))
    dbbolton · 2010-06-11 22:57:09 0
  • Specify the size in bytes using the 'c' option for the -size flag. The + sign reads as "bigger than". Then execute du on the list; sort in reverse mode and show the first 10 occurrences. Show Sample Output


    2
    find /myfs -size +209715200c -exec du -m {} \; |sort -nr |head -10
    arlequin · 2011-07-07 21:12:46 0
  • this will open a new tab in firefox for every line in a file the sleep is removable but i found that if you have a large list of urls 50+, and no sleep, it will try to open all the urls at once and this will cause them all to load a lot slower, also depending on the ram of your system sleep gives you a chance to close the tabs before they overload your ram, removing & >2/dev/null will yield unpredictable results.


    2
    for line in `cat $file`; do firefox -new-tab "$line" & 2>/dev/null; sleep 1; done
    hamsolo474 · 2011-11-12 13:47:24 0
  • Converts a number of bytes provided as input, to a human readable number. Show Sample Output


    2
    human_filesize() { awk -v sum="$1" ' BEGIN {hum[1024^3]="Gb"; hum[1024^2]="Mb"; hum[1024]="Kb"; for (x=1024^3; x>=1024; x/=1024) { if (sum>=x) { printf "%.2f %s\n",sum/x,hum[x]; break; } } if (sum<1024) print "1kb"; } '}
    ArtBIT · 2011-12-02 18:21:20 0
  • "What it actually shows is going to be dependent on the commands you've previously entered. When you do this, bash looks for the last command that you entered that contains the substring "ls", in my case that was "lsof ...". If the command that bash finds is what you're looking for, just hit Enter to execute it. You can also edit the command to suit your current needs before executing it (use the left and right arrow keys to move through it). If you're looking for a different command, hit Ctrl+R again to find a matching command further back in the command history. You can also continue to type a longer substring to refine the search, since searching is incremental. Note that the substring you enter is searched for throughout the command, not just at the beginning of the command." - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/using-bash-history-more-efficiently Show Sample Output


    2
    <ctrl+r>
    *deleted* · 2012-04-15 16:42:32 0
  • list the top 15 folders by decreasing size in MB Show Sample Output


    2
    du -xB M --max-depth=2 /var | sort -rn | head -n 15
    bouktin · 2013-05-23 10:45:21 0
  • Optionally, pipe the output into http://sed.sourceforge.net/grabbag/scripts/html2iso.sed Or: wget -qO - http://www.asciiartfarts.com/random.cgi | sed -n '//,//p' | sed -n '/ Show Sample Output


    2
    wget -qO - http://www.asciiartfarts.com/random.cgi | sed -n '/<pre>/,/<\/pre>/p' | sed -n '/<table*/,/<\/table>/p' | sed '1d' | sed '$d' | recode html..ascii
    krunktron · 2013-08-17 19:42:47 0

  • 2
    grep -v rootfs /proc/mounts > /etc/mtab
    ohe · 2014-01-21 14:28:12 0
  • To show ipv6 instead, use [[ -6 ]] instead of [[ -4 ]] ip -o -6 a s | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}' To show only the IP of a specific interface, in case you get more than one result: ip -o -4 a s eth0 | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}' ip -o -4 a s wlan0 | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}' Show Sample Output


    2
    ip -o -4 a s | awk -F'[ /]+' '$2!~/lo/{print $4}'
    paulera · 2015-02-13 11:19:31 4

  • 2
    tr '\0' ' ' </proc/21679/cmdline ; echo
    pdxdoughnut · 2015-09-25 22:08:31 5
  • Assumes you've downloaded Toni Corvera's vcs script (http://p.outlyer.net/vcs), have it in your PATH, and have installed the script's dependencies. Generates a video contact sheet of 24 thumbnails and 3 thumbnails per column. The bold font and white-on-black color scheme keeps the text readable at the chosen 70% JPEG compression quality, which keeps the file size at a manageable level. You can go even lower with the quality and get a good looking result.


    2
    vcs -c 3 -H 220 -n 24 -dt -ds -dp -j --anonymous -O bg_heading=black -O bg_sign=black -O fg_heading=white -O fg_heading=white -O fg_sign=white -O fg_title=white -O font_heading=DejaVu-Sans-Bold -O quality=70
    Negate · 2018-06-06 00:49:25 0
  • Uses the shell builtin `declare` with the '-f' flag to output only functions to grep out only the function names. You can use it as an alias or function like so: alias shfunctions="builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'" shfunctions () { builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'; } Show Sample Output


    2
    builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'
    sciro · 2018-07-23 05:24:04 0
  • explanation: grep -- displays process ids -v -- negates the matching, displays all but what is specified in the other options -u -- specifies the user to display, or in this case negate The process loops through all PIDs that are found by pgrep, then orders a forced kill to the processes in numerical order, effectively killing the parent processes first including the shells in use which will force the users to logout. Tested on Slackware Linux 12.2 and Slackware-current


    1
    for i in $(pgrep -v -u root);do kill -9 $i;done
    lostnhell · 2009-03-24 02:54:52 2
  • and, a lot uglier, with sed: ifconfig | sed -n '/inet addr:/s/[^:]\+:\(\S\+\).*/\1/p' Edit: Wanted to be shorter than the perl version. Still think that the perl version is the best..


    1
    ifconfig | awk -F':| +' '/ddr:/{print $4}'
    0x89 · 2009-07-25 22:51:08 0
  • The initial version of this command also outputted extra empty lines, so it went like this: 192.168.166.48 127.0.0.1 This happened on Ubuntu, i haven't tested on anything else. Show Sample Output


    1
    ifconfig | awk '/ddr:[0-9]/ {sub(/addr:/, ""); print $2}'
    danny_b85 · 2009-07-31 09:30:54 0
  • default stack size is 10M. This makes your multithread app filling rapidly your memory. on my PC I was able to create only 300thread with default stack size. Lower the default stack size to the one effectively used by your threads, let you create more. ex. putting 64k I was able to create more than 10.000threads. Obviously ...your thread shouldn't need more than 64k ram!!!


    1
    ulimit -s 64
    ioggstream · 2009-08-06 10:40:25 0
  • you must be in the directory to analyse report all files and links in the currect directory, not recursively. this find command ahs been tested on hp-ux/linux/aix/solaris. Show Sample Output


    1
    find . \( ! -name . -prune \) \( -type f -o -type l \)
    mobidyc · 2009-09-12 15:58:56 5
  • USAGE: gate listening_port host port Creates listening socket and connects to remote device at host:port. It uses pipes for connection between two sockets. Traffic which goes through pipes is wrote to stdout. I use it for debug network scripts.


    1
    gate() { mkfifo /tmp/sock1 /tmp/sock2 &> /dev/null && nc -p $1 -l < /tmp/sock1 | tee /tmp/sock2 & PID=$! && nc $2 $3 < /tmp/sock2 | tee /tmp/sock1; kill -KILL $PID; rm -f /tmp/sock1 /tmp/sock2 ; }
    true · 2009-09-25 08:10:23 1

  • 1
    iscsiadm -m discovery -t sendtargets -p 192.168.20.51
    w00binda · 2009-11-02 16:10:07 0
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Batch Convert SVG to PNG
Convert some SVG files into PNG using ImageMagick's convert command.

Record your desktop
That will capture 200 seconds of video at fullscreen 1680x1050 resolution, but scaled down 25 percent, with 15 frames per second. http://fusioncast.blogspot.com/2007/09/infobyte-how-i-record-my-desktop.html

make image semi-transparent

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

pdfcount: get number of pages in a PDF file

Display which distro is installed
Works on Ubuntu

see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network
see the TIME_WAIT and ESTABLISHED nums of the network

Summarize Apache Extended server-status to show longest running requests
Ever need to know why Apache is bogging down *right now*? Hate scanning Apache's Extended server-status for the longest running requests? Me, too. That's why I use this one liner to quickly find suspect web scripts that might need review. Assuming the Extended server-status is reachable at the target URL desired, this one-liner parses the output through elinks (rendering the HTML) and shows a list of active requests sorted by longest running request at the bottom of the list. I include the following fields (as noted in the header line): Seconds: How long the request is alive PID: Process ID of the request handler State: State of the request, limited to what I think are the relevant ones (GCRK_.) IP: Remote Host IP making the request Domain: Virtual Host target (HTTP/1.1 Host: header). Important for Virtual Hosting servers TYPE: HTTP verb URL: requested URL being served. Putting this in a script that runs when triggered by high load average can be quite revealing. Can also capture "forgotten" scripts being exploited such as "formmail.pl", etc.

ttyS0 - terminal on serial connection
I actually planned to do this for quite a long time, but since I haven't had any suitable client hardware, I procrastinated this. Now, the old laptop I've got from my dad, features an RS-232 port. So, now that I had technically a client, that I could test my RS-232 connection with, I ordered a null modem cable. There is no RS-232 outlet on my desktop computer directly on the mainboard, but theres a connector on the mainbord, where a RS-232 outlet can be attached to. The outlet will then cover up a PCI slot. # Activating RS-232 Ok, once all cables were in place, I tried to access both RS-232 ports by reading from them directly. They're usually ttyS0 or ttyS1, depending what COM-Port it is. From the file /proc/tty/driver/serial, information about the serial setup can be obtained. A setserial -q /dev/ttyS0 might be usefull as well. Usually, the UART Type is 16550A, on a standard PC. Mine wasn't working though. At leas not right from the start, when I tried to read the interface with cat /dev/ttyS0 I got the following error: # cat /dev/ttyS0 cat: /dev/ttyS0: Input/output error Obviously, the driver couldn't activate the hardware. Reason was, it was deactivated in BIOS. After activating RS-232 there, it worked well. As a last action, I added myself to the uucp group, so I have user permission to the serial lines. It is not necessary for the terminal setup, but a good idea to do so, just for future projects, maybe... # Setting up a terminal Once the Serial line is configured and working properly, it's time to let a terminal run on that port. This is what I added to my /etc/inittab : s0:2345:respawn:/sbin/agetty -L 38400 ttyS0 I added it quite on the top of that file, right below the 'si' statement, mingetty cannot be used for serial connections, it cannot be run in a console, too. I tried it for testing purposes, but the cosole - along with your login program - will log you out, as soon as you log in over your serial line. '-L' means this is a local line, with no carrier signal. 38400 is the standard speed of a Linux console, it might be a bit high, I was told, but it works well. I tested that with some higher values as well (115200) and it worked too, I guess it tepends on things like cable length, etc. Last parameter, is the serial tty to listen on. The terminal type can be specified as an additional parameter at the end of the parameter list, vt102, for instance. This is sometimes required, depending on the client. After finishing editing /etc/inittab, an init q will make the system re-read /etc/inittab and apply changes. The agetty should now be listening on ttyS0. #Setting up a client It's time to establish a connection and test the serial line. I use a laptop, that has an RS-232 port, so some preliminary setup is required. I tried minicom as terminal initially, but it turned out, not to be the best client. It initializes the modem, this lasts quite long, and it doesn't convey ANSI colors. So the better option is cu, it's part of the UUCP-Package. Oh, and the serial port of that computer, has to be accessible as well, of course. Once everything was set up, I established the connection: $ cu -l ttyS0 -38400 --nostop Pretty self explanatory, I think. The --nostop option disables XON/XOFF handling. # root access over ttyS0 In order to become root over the serial terminal, the tty needs to be added to /etc/securetty I appended ttyS0 to the end of the file. It is now possible, to gain root access over the serial terminal. The agetty process needs to be restarted to apply changes. # Accessing GRUB over ttyS0 To make bootloader access possible over ttyS0, some changes to /boot/grub/menu.lst need to be done. (GRUB is the bootloader I use, I suppose LiLo has similar capabilities.) Those are the lines, I appended to the top of my menu.lst : serial --unit=0 --speed=38400 --word=8 --parity=no --stop=1 terminal --timeout=3 serial console The serial command initiates the serial terminal option, --unit=0 defines our first serial connector, I my case, it's the only one I have on my machine. I used the standard Linux-Console speed, as well as the "8N1" connection strategy. terminal defines the terminal priorities, first terminal (serial) is the standard one, the last one is the secondary terminal (console). --timeout=3 enables a delay on both consoles, with a prompt for a keystroke. Depending on which terminal, the key is pressed, this terminal, will be used. If no key is pressed after the timeout, the standard console (in my case serial) will be used. # Relaying Kernel output on boot The Kernel accepts multiple console options, of which the last one, is the standard console, and the one that will be used in Single User mode. These are my Kernel options: title Fedora Core (2.6.20-1.2316.fc5) root (hd0,0) kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.20-1.2316.fc5 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet vga=795 console=tty0 console=ttyS0,38400 initrd /initrd-2.6.20-1.2316.fc5.img console=tty0 is the standard console, located on the machine, i.e. monitor and keyboard.

Rename files in batch


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