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find with high precission (nanoseconds 1/1,000,000,000s) the last changed file.
this is good for variables if you have many script created files and if you want to know which one is the last created/changed one..

check open ports without netstat or lsof

get useful statistics from tcpdump (sort by ip)
We can get useful statistics from tcpdump with this simple command. Thanks "Babak Farrokhi" to teaching me this ;)

list files recursively by size

View all date formats, Quick Reference Help Alias
If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com $ ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date [email protected]$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C '[email protected]' $ # /home/gpl/.ssh/[email protected] # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory $ tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g'

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Show apps that use internet connection at the moment. (Multi-Language)

Use "most" as your man pager
you should have the "most" package installed. I like it because it is colorful and easier to read. alternatively you can use "less" instead of "most". you can also add this to your ~/.bashrc to make it permanent.

Convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format
Convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format using sed command


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